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Nag Hammadi-"Chenoboskion Manuscripts"

Discussion in 'Spirituality and Religion' started by Mayhem, Oct 6, 2017.

  1. Mayhem

    Mayhem III oculis videt Premium

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    The Nag Hammadi Library, a collection of thirteen ancient books (called "codices") containing over fifty texts, was discovered in upper Egypt in 1945. This immensely important discovery includes a large number of primary "Gnostic Gospels" – texts once thought to have been entirely destroyed during the early Christian struggle to define "orthodoxy" – scriptures such as the Gospel of Thomas, the Gospel of Philip, and the Gospel of Truth. The discovery and translation of the Nag Hammadi library, initially completed in the 1970's, has provided impetus to a major re-evaluation of early Christian history and the nature of Gnosticism.
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    Full text of "The Nag Hammadi Library.pdf (PDFy mirror)"
     
  2. Snake Plissken

    Snake Plissken I believe.. Premium

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    Just think how much was lost when the Library of Alexandria burned.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2017
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  3. Mayhem

    Mayhem III oculis videt Premium

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    The discoverer of the Nag Hammadi documents along with some of his relatives.
     


  4. Mayhem

    Mayhem III oculis videt Premium

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    "On each side of the Nile valley, vertical rocks climb with a deserted terrain at the top. The rocky region on the right bank marking the boundary of the Nile valley and the arable land between Heneboksion and Pabau is called Jebel al-Tarif. Back in prehistoric times a massive boulder fell from the rock, resembling a stalagmite in shape, which fell down on a scree. From the north side of one of the giant barrel-shaped boulders, a vessel with the Nag Hammadi library was hidden.
    The rocks of Jabal al-Tarif from the Nile valley Until the excavations began, the caves carved into the base of Jabal al-Tarif were buried under the embankment of deluvium and cobblestones. Scree leading to the base of the rock. View of the rocks from below. The location of the Nag Hammadi manuscripts.