Eridanus Supervoid is a parallel universe


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HDRKID

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Another explanation could be that due to data from light passing through the most distant gas clouds and star debris which shows the abnormal behavior of electrons, that the speed of light isn't constant over the life of the universe, in other words the laws of physics change with the age of the universe.
The universal horizon is at roughly 30 billion light years, we can't see anything beyond that. Either nothing exists out there, or anything out there is so far out that light hasn't reached us because it would take longer than the lifespan of the universe. At some time then, by accepted physics, what would become our galaxy was once alone in it's own self contained bubble, with a horizon too close too see any other 'would be galaxies' and etc. etc. Thus at some time galaxies were completely blind to the existence of each other until the horizon expanded enough until suddenly their light reached each other. What we have here is a horizon problem, and it is similarly solved by the a variable speed of light.
 
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Another explanation could be that due to data from light passing through the most distant gas clouds and star debris which shows the abnormal behavior of electrons, that the speed of light isn't constant over the life of the universe, in other words the laws of physics change with the age of the universe.
The universal horizon is at roughly 30 billion light years, we can't see anything beyond that. Either nothing exists out there, or anything out there is so far out that light hasn't reached us because it would take longer than the lifespan of the universe. At some time then, by accepted physics, what would become our galaxy was once alone in it's own self contained bubble, with a horizon too close too see any other 'would be galaxies' and etc. etc. Thus at some time galaxies were completely blind to the existence of each other until the horizon expanded enough until suddenly their light reached each other. What we have here is a horizon problem, and it is similarly solved by the a variable speed of light.
Do you have any clue how much sense you make that most will never understand Orpheus Rex?
 
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Do you have any clue how much sense you make that most will never understand Orpheus Rex?
I do! Yet, I wonder if I might be better off in ignorance about it! What I've said here isn't even much of a rabbit hole to fall through. Nietzsche cast himself as the madman and I've been learning to do the same.
 

The_Observer

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I do! Yet, I wonder if I might be better off in ignorance about it! What I've said here isn't even much of a rabbit hole to fall through. Nietzsche cast himself as the madman and I've been learning to do the same.
Whatever you've done has worked. I see you as a completely insane entity of unsound mind. You're now free from the chains of observation to continue your good work sir.
 

TimeFlipper

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Another explanation could be that due to data from light passing through the most distant gas clouds and star debris which shows the abnormal behavior of electrons, that the speed of light isn't constant over the life of the universe, in other words the laws of physics change with the age of the universe.
The universal horizon is at roughly 30 billion light years, we can't see anything beyond that. Either nothing exists out there, or anything out there is so far out that light hasn't reached us because it would take longer than the lifespan of the universe. At some time then, by accepted physics, what would become our galaxy was once alone in it's own self contained bubble, with a horizon too close too see any other 'would be galaxies' and etc. etc. Thus at some time galaxies were completely blind to the existence of each other until the horizon expanded enough until suddenly their light reached each other. What we have here is a horizon problem, and it is similarly solved by the a variable speed of light.
Actually youre not far from the truth, light does actually slow down very slightly, when it passes through our own atmosphere...
Therefore when it passes through gas clouds in the universe, it most certainly could slow down even more than through our own atmosphere..