Future invention timeline?


Maximum7

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I'm trying to make a mini timeline from 2017-2050. Each year should have one future invention. Just one invention every year from now until 2050. No need to explain how it works. Be creative! Thanks!!
 

Mayhem

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I'm trying to make a mini timeline from 2017-2050. Each year should have one future invention. Just one invention every year from now until 2050. No need to explain how it works. Be creative! Thanks!!

Your age?
 

TimeFlipper

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A simple check revealed that Maximum7 was last seen on here nine months ago on September19th 2017 ....Just click onto name to see when a member was last on here ;) :D..
Maybe he already found his inventions :LOL:..
 

HDRKID

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Frankly, I always thought that in the future, people would live in space. It appears that I was wrong.

delete_live_in_space.jpg
 

walt69

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Frankly, I always thought that in the future, people would live in space. It appears that I was wrong.
does the space station count?, we've been told that we have been sharing the space station swapping out astronauts on occasion for a few years..or do you mean on a greater scale?
 

Kairos

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Somewhere around 2050, I am sure we will be reinventing the water mill and possibly the Moldboard plough.

If this were a school assignment, I'd make it funny. Start with some normal technological progression. Then some kind of disruptive technology. Then some reactions to it as people get unemployed or whatever. Then radioactive water cleaning technology, followed by medieval farming reinventions.
 
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The_Observer

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Somewhere around 2050, I am sure we will be reinventing the water mill and possibly the Moldboard plough.

If this were a school assignment, I'd make it funny. Start with some normal technological progression. Then some kind of disruptive technology. Then some reactions to it as people get unemployed or whatever. Then radioactive water cleaning technology, followed by medieval farming reinventions.
We will definitely be doing some reinventions. During the industrial revolution, a lot of inventions existed that don't today. Most of them revolving around transport and engines. The reason being, is because the coal and gas industries monopolized the markets for so long and destroyed any upcoming competition. Only now are we finally seeing electric vehicles emerge after over 120 years of fossil fuel usage - yet electric vehicles were being invented over 100 years ago. Even a lot of our green initiatives are still being backed by the coal and gas industries because they are so heavily ingrained into our society it's hard to get rid of overnight. For example, when you plug in your electric car at home to charge, that electricity is coming from a coal plant.

One thing that bothers me is we can clearly see future faults in our designs and implementations but we do nothing about it because it would cost money. We only do something to resolve a problem when a lot of people get hurt or die. That indicates to me that society as a whole, or especially capitalism, favors monetary value over human life. It's also indicative that humans like to play dumb for personal gain; aka saving money.

Anyways, point is, we'll be seeing some old inventions arise in a modern form to snub out self-destructive methods of survival as a species.
 

The_Observer

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Frankly, I always thought that in the future, people would live in space. It appears that I was wrong.
I'm pretty sure we do live in space bro. Earth is nothing but a giant organic space ship floating in space. If you landed on another planet, what's the difference besides it being uninhabitable or barren? There is literally zero reason for us to leave this planet because A) we've not found another confirmed habitable planet like our own and B) the destruction of our planet is not imminent. We'll continue sending probes and robots and rovers to explore and gather information but we're not going to live in space.

Also, humans are not built to live in space, you couldn't survive for a long time in anti-gravity. Your muscles would deteriorate and become useless. Astronauts on the ISS have to go through rehabilitation when they come back to Earth - they have to learn to do all motor functions over again including walking and eating, and they normally only stay in space for periods of up to a year or so. We're also a far way away technologically speaking, from being able to make areas of space habitable for us: such has having a base on the moon. The ISS is our only space base right now and we routinely have to send them supplies for survival.
 

TimeFlipper

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I'm pretty sure we do live in space bro. Earth is nothing but a giant organic space ship floating in space. If you landed on another planet, what's the difference besides it being uninhabitable or barren? There is literally zero reason for us to leave this planet because A) we've not found another confirmed habitable planet like our own and B) the destruction of our planet is not imminent. We'll continue sending probes and robots and rovers to explore and gather information but we're not going to live in space.

Also, humans are not built to live in space, you couldn't survive for a long time in anti-gravity. Your muscles would deteriorate and become useless. Astronauts on the ISS have to go through rehabilitation when they come back to Earth - they have to learn to do all motor functions over again including walking and eating, and they normally only stay in space for periods of up to a year or so. We're also a far way away technologically speaking, from being able to make areas of space habitable for us: such has having a base on the moon. The ISS is our only space base right now and we routinely have to send them supplies for survival.
COLBERT the ISS treadmill, CEVIS the ISS stationary bike, and ARED the ISS simulated weight lifting, is all the exercise equipment for the Astronauts on board the ISS...They have to exercise for at least 2 hours everyday ;)..

The Russian Cosmonaut Valeri Polyakov holds the world record for spending 437 consecutive days on board the space station MIR, between 1994 to 1995, at the ripe old age of 53!! :eek:..he is still alive today aged 76 :cool:..

The NASA female Astronaut Peggy Whitson, retired shortly after her final space flight in 2017 aged 57...She spent a total time in space of 665 days...Middle aged people are certainly favoured more for long term space flights, i reckon @TnWatchdog and me should put in for a couple of those space flights!!! (y):LOL:..
 
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