Gravity

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Unintentional

Active Member
Messages
577
Gravity

I have been thinking of this theory for a while and some things seems to have click after reading Grayson's posts about entropy.

It have been proven by observation and measurement that massive objects slow down time in their vincinity.

Most problems with UFT is a way to incorporate gravity.

My theory is gravity is not a force like EM or anything else, but a function of time.

All things are spinning or have things orbiting around them. Imagine a simple hydrogen atom. The central proton is spinning and it has a single electron orbiting. As this atom aproaches a massive object (or actually any object with mass) one side (the side closest to the object with mass) of it will have a slower time than the other side. To conserve angular momentum, the atom MUST move closer to the object with mass. Incidently the object with mass moves closer to the atom, but if it is more massive it will move proportionally less.

This theory holds up with massive objects pulling on other massive objects. If each object is made of a trillion atoms or more, they are all spinning and they all have one side that is slower in time than the other side. They each must converse anguler momentum and so the object as a whole (but in reality it is each tiny atom acting in concert with the others) moves towards other objects.

To see this conservation of angular momentum yourself: Tie a ball to a string. Swing the ball by the string really fast. Smack the ball in midmotion with your hand or appoach a wall and have the wall hit the ball. Don't smack it hard enough to stop the ball, but only graze it and slow it down. As the ball slows down, your hand is "pulled" toward the wall or hand or whatever you used to slow down the ball. This is the conservation of angular momentum.

Another way of looking at this is picture your self standing on the earth (or sitting). The top of your head is actually in a faster time than your feet. The difference might be 1 billionth or 1 trillionth of a second difference per second, but the difference IS there. Remember gravity is very very very VERY weak compared to the other forces. As the bottom of all your spinning atoms are in a slower time than the tops of them, they are being pulled downward.

I don't recall all the formulaes off hand, but if there are any really scientific types out there, is there anything basically wrong with my theory? :unsure:
 

Phoenix

Active Member
Messages
631
Gravity

It sounds right.

Where is Resomb? We need him on this board.
 

Ralan

Member
Messages
361
Gravity

Gravity; is it an extension of time?

No.
 

Unintentional

Active Member
Messages
577
Gravity


Why I never considered it from that point of view before. You are absolutely right! Thanks for explaining where my theory is wrong. Your arguement makes so much more sense. :lol:

Seriously though, if my theory was right, it could be proved by lowering things down to absolute zero. If super cold tempertures lower atomic size activity, maybey it also slows there spin and would therefore weigh less. I wonder if anyone has ever checked this. Things near absolute zero are rare and the people who have actually weighed them might be rarer still. :(

Another test would be if all the poles of all the atoms in an object were all perfectly alligned AND if they were all perpendictular to the earth, they would weigh less. The question is, how to do that. :unsure:
 

Phoenix

Active Member
Messages
631
Gravity

I know I have seen stuff related to what you are talking about in the mean time I do wish to share with you the page on hyperphysics dealing with the superfluidity attribute of liquid helium at 2.17 K. Somewhat along the lines that you wre talking about.

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/lhel.html

Liquid Helium

Kamerlingh Onnes worked for many years to liquify the element which persisted as a gas to the lowest temperature. Using liquid air to produce liquid hydrogen and then the hydrogen to jacket the liquification apparatus, he produced about 60 cubic centimeters of liquid helium on July 10, 1908. Its boiling point was found to be 4.2 K. Onnes received the Nobel Prize in 1913 for his low temperature work leading to this achievement.

When helium is cooled to a critical temperature of 2.17 K (called its lambda point), a remarkable discontinuity in heat capacity occurs, the liquid density drops, and a fraction of the liquid becomes a zero viscosity \"superfluid\". Superfluidity arises from the fraction of helium atoms which has condensed to the lowest possible energy.

An important application of liquid helium has been in the study of superconductivity and for the applications of superconducting magnets.
Liquid helium working range

Superfluidity

A remarkable transition occurs in the properties of liquid helium at the temperature 2.17 K, called the \"lambda point\" for helium. Part of the liquid becomes a \"superfluid\", a zero viscosity fluid which will move rapidly through any pore in the apparatus.

A vacuum container which seemed to be leak tight could suddenly leak helium rapidly as the superfluid moved out through a microscopic hole. A vertical tube could produce a fountain effect as the superfluid moved up the walls and out the top.

In 1938, F. London proposed a \"two-fluid\" model to explain the behavior of the liquid: normal liquid and the superfluid fraction consisting of those atoms which have \"condensed\" to the ground state and make no contribution to the entropy or heat capacity of the liquid. This condensed fraction is the standard example of Bose-Einstein condensation.

Another remarkable characteristic of the the superfluid is its very high heat conductivity, 30 times that of copper!
Application in IRAS Satellite
Index


Lambda Point for Liquid Helium
When helium is cooled to a critical temperature of 2.17 K , a remarkable discontinuity in heat capacity occurs, the liquid density drops, and a fraction of the liquid becomes a zero viscosity \"superfluid\". It is called the lambda point because the shape of the specific heat curve is like that Greek letter. Superfluidity arises from the fraction of helium atoms which has condensed to the lowest possible energy by a process called Bose-Einstein condensation.
 

Grayson

Senior Member
Messages
1,117
Gravity

I am just so thrilled that Unintentional read my post on Entropy. :lol:

YOUR THEORY SOUNDS GOOD TO ME FELLA. <_<

If you can break that down into smaller pieces, I might get my head around it. I need little science in order to understand you. Sorry. :(
 

koaon

Junior Member
Messages
25
Gravity

Originally posted by Grayson@Jun 17 2004, 02:52 AM
If you can break that down into smaller pieces, I might get my head around it.
Yeah, Grayson. Exactly how I feel when reading some of your lengthy posts. :D
 

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