His Machine

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Orpheus Rex

Member
Messages
479
His machine appears to work by creating an infinitely long Tippler cylinder contained by two artificial black holes. The cylinder would then be rotated at near light speeds in an indeterminable direction.
Can anyone add more details?
 

outspoken

Junior Member
Messages
67
why are you building one in your garage? Ask GE they should tell you how to build one.
 

Orpheus Rex

Member
Messages
479
Nah, I use my garage for refurbishing game systems... I'm more interested in the supposed physics behind the machine. I want to see if my assessment is accurate.
 

Earthmasque

Member
Messages
150
His machine appears to work by creating an infinitely long Tippler cylinder contained by two artificial black holes. The cylinder would then be rotated at near light speeds in an indeterminable direction.
Can anyone add more details?
Here's one.
Titor claimed that each miniature black hole was "about the size of an electron."

Given the equation for the Schwarzschild radius, and using the "classical" value for electron radius, we note that each "miniature" black hole would have to weigh in at almost 19 trillion kilograms.

Must've been SOME custom suspension on that Chevy he drove around in.
 

Ayasano

Member
Messages
407
His machine appears to work by creating an infinitely long Tippler cylinder contained by two artificial black holes. The cylinder would then be rotated at near light speeds in an indeterminable direction.
Can anyone add more details?
Here's one.
Titor claimed that each miniature black hole was "about the size of an electron."

Given the equation for the Schwarzschild radius, and using the "classical" value for electron radius, we note that each "miniature" black hole would have to weigh in at almost 19 trillion kilograms.

Must've been SOME custom suspension on that Chevy he drove around in.

It's interesting that he would refer to an electron having a radius since it's been known for some time that an electron is a point particle. That would be like someone using the four humours in an example of illness.
 

Earthmasque

Member
Messages
150
There is such a "radius," though.

One way to think of it is that it is close as you can get one electron bunched up against another one.
 


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