No absolutes

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eiqu7aha

New Member
Messages
8
No absolutes

My philosophy states that all things in the universe are possible. Therefore, you cannot say that I cannot jump 10 feet in the air and float. Although it is not probable, it's possible. For example, a magnetic field might affect the laws of gravity. If all truths can be changed by variables, then there are no absolutes. Since it's possible that there are unknown variables in the universe, then there cannot be absolute truths.

Using this theory I cannot prove to you that I can jump 10 feet in the air and float, nor can you prove that I cannot. It is not possible to remove all variables, so truths are in fact probabilities. Everything that we observe is affected by variables. It is even possible for a variable to affect the property of light, thus fooling us into seeing something that we are not.

I suggest my theory provides a different, but better approach to science. It allows for all things to be possible, including the existence of God. Nevertheless, it makes it impossible to prove the existence of an absolute. It does not even allow you to conclude that what seems more probable is most likely true, because even that can change. However, you can suggest that something is most likely true until it is no longer probable.

We are often forced to decide whether something is right or wrong, true or false. If there are no absolutes, then you cannot ultimately answer these questions. All you can provide is what is probable at the moment. Even that is subjective, because you have nothing absolute to compare it with.

As technology advances, it shold allow us to better understand our universe and human reaction. However, it seems logical that variables will always limit our rationale to probabilities rather than absolutes. I believe everything is subjective, and therefore there are no absolutes but only probabilities.
 

Cubby

New Member
Messages
19
Re: No absolutes

The eastern philosopher's titled that one as "the unchanging law of change". The rate of change is proportionate to the elements involved. Watch for it when a rock and running water play together and the rock slowly transforms into "pebble" and "sand". Even if they were always the same unchanged elements.
 

StarLord

Senior Member
Messages
3,187
Re: No absolutes

Just imagine what you could learn if you could slow your vibrations to that of a mineral, rock and talk to the pebbles
 

Cubby

New Member
Messages
19
Re: No absolutes

As science half-heartedly tries to explain(while endlessly retreating into uncertainty) our developed brain as of yet corresponds more to the living, the reptillian, plant, and mammal. We often neglect explorations in our fear of them, that's no doubt, but it's no question that our bodies as of now can't process death in any living way other than a new change.. they can process the feelings associated with death though however accurate or innacurate though.
 

Eutychus

Junior Member
Messages
37
Re: No absolutes

<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(\"bcerhart\")</div>
My philosophy states that all things in the universe are possible. ?[/b]

Bcerhart, would you touch your right elbow with your right hand for me?:p
 

Cubby

New Member
Messages
19
Re: No absolutes

Possible but improbable was the general concensus on that. One could conceive quite a few ways to attain the goal of "my right hand on my right elbow"... The first coming to mind a little messy.
 

Dmitri

Junior Member
Messages
89
Re: No absolutes

What do you, guys, think of Carlos Castaneda? I loved to read him years ago before I came to this country (about 8 years ago). Is he popular, is he respected?

Thank you,

Dmitri
 

Wildstar

New Member
Messages
17
Re: No absolutes

In an Infinite universe it may be possible that regions far removed from us obey different physical laws. Walking on the ceiling might be possible because gravity is different. Perhaps the humans in that expanse of space can manipulate gravity and move wherever at will. But we have the Copernican principle that state that we are not in a special place. that the laws of nature are the same everywhere. So maybe it's possible in an infinite universe, or in a parallel universe, but as far as we know now it's not.
 

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