Paula's Search for Artifacts

PaulaJedi

Survivor
Zenith
Messages
8,817
I've come to a conclusion. Because there are NO rocks on my property anywhere, not even when we dig, there would be no materials for natives to have made arrowheads. And with all the sand, this was probably a huge lake. The natives lived closer to the river (they have evidence). Although I'm not far, they would have lived right along it. It doesn't explain why I haven't found metal objects from the 1800's, unless previous owners already found everything.

I don't know why it is so important for me to find something. It makes me sad when I come up empty handed. I guess I'm weird.
 

PaulaJedi

Survivor
Zenith
Messages
8,817
9 lbs. Dug up from under an overturned tree.

Meteorite? Basalt? Lavarock?
 

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james

Junior Member
Messages
81
Map dowsing is how you want to find things on your property. Get a nice big map of your property and use dowsing rods or pendulum to find what you are looking for. It is cheaper and can be thoroughly effective.
 

Wind7

Moderator
Staff
Messages
8,518
9 lbs. Dug up from under an overturned tree.

Meteorite? Basalt? Lavarock?

I would venture a guess that what you have here is a nice Fulgurite deposit.
This can happen when a tree is struck by lightning,
it eventually kills the tree and can leave a healthy deposit underneath.
Some can fuse with mineral deposits and even create something new...Or uncharted.

"When lightning strikes a tree, the ground typically explodes out, and the surrounding grass dies, forming a scar and sending electric discharge through nearby rock, soil and sand, forming fulgurites, also known as 'fossilized lightning'," Pasek said.
~
Apr 12, 2023

Source ~ See the newly discovered fossilized material left behind by a Florida lightning strike
 

PaulaJedi

Survivor
Zenith
Messages
8,817
I would venture a guess that what you have here is a nice Fulgurite deposit.
This can happen when a tree is struck by lightning,
it eventually kills the tree and can leave a healthy deposit underneath.
Some can fuse with mineral deposits and even create something new...Or uncharted.

"When lightning strikes a tree, the ground typically explodes out, and the surrounding grass dies, forming a scar and sending electric discharge through nearby rock, soil and sand, forming fulgurites, also known as 'fossilized lightning'," Pasek said.
~
Apr 12, 2023

Source ~ See the newly discovered fossilized material left behind by a Florida lightning strike

That makes sense. Many overturned trees show charcoal from having been struck. Still cool if you think about it!
 

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