Craig Johnson possible time travel or teleportation experiment machine

NaturalPhilosopher

Senior Member
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eric lathiwates' precessional gyroscopes that seem to lose weight is really interesting.
again the gyroscope itself is spinning on an axle.

then he said if you hold the axle in your hand horizonally so the gyro is vertical he says when he starts to turn it around his body(his body moving in a circle while holding it) he says the whole setup wants to continue to move in a circle but also raise up into the air.

he was old, the gyro was like 50lbs and at the end of a long axle that he held. he couldn't even lift it but if he held it closer to the gyro disc and started moving in a circle he could hold the end of the axle easily.
 

NaturalPhilosopher

Senior Member
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1,903
oh c'mon, it's easily understood.
accelerating masses want to fly in the direction they're accelerated.
Acceleration if it ends at the end of the 90 degree arc no longer produces an a unidirectional force.
it has to speed up and up each rotational cycle(only on a small segment of the 360 arc) to produce the directional force.

accelerate, coast, accelerate, coast.

if you launch projectiles from an accelerating rotating platform in the same direction each time...they transfer momentum to a wall.

pew pew
 

Einstein

Temporal Engineer
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3,910
I've seen the Laithwate gyro experiment. I've tried to build a device on that principle. The gyros keep destroying the motor shafts. But even though the gyro appears to lose weight. No weight is lost with him standing on a scale.
 

Einstein

Temporal Engineer
Messages
3,910
oh c'mon, it's easily understood.
accelerating masses want to fly in the direction they're accelerated.
Acceleration if it ends at the end of the 90 degree arc no longer produces an a unidirectional force.
it has to speed up and up each rotational cycle(only on a small segment of the 360 arc) to produce the directional force.

accelerate, coast, accelerate, coast.

if you launch projectiles from a rotating platform in the same direction each time...they transfer momentum to a wall.

The problem is a rotational force is produced. Not linear.
 

NaturalPhilosopher

Senior Member
Messages
1,903
I've seen the Laithwate gyro experiment. I've tried to build a device on that principle. The gyros keep destroying the motor shafts. But even though the gyro appears to lose weight. No weight is lost with him standing on a scale.
exactly, why he said it was a delay between action and reaction(newton's 3rd law).
which is significant.

the question is the vector direction of the precession.
it's at a right angle to the gyroscope rotation. upwards.

same direction as IAT force.
 

Einstein

Temporal Engineer
Messages
3,910
exactly, why he said it was a delay between action and reaction(newton's 3rd law).
which is significant.

the question is the vector direction of the precession.
it's at a right angle to the gyroscope rotation. upwards.
It's not linear. That lift is actual producing a torque. Torques make things move in circles.
 

NaturalPhilosopher

Senior Member
Messages
1,903
exactly.
the lift effect didn't happen if he just held the axle.
if he twirled it like a dancing ballerina then it wants to go up.

does that secondary rotation do something to imbalance the IAT force?
cuz his system was a gyroscope, not asymmetric spinning masses.

but...becomes an asymmetric mass if he twirls like a little girl.
hehe.

he put the whole thing in a jig to see if it produces an overall force upwards...always came back negative.
the gyros would rise then hit the top and drop back down and rise again.

so up force first, then down force 2nd.
like he said, delay of action and reaction.
funny how it's the same direction as the IAT tumble.
 

Einstein

Temporal Engineer
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3,910
The IAT force almost seems like a tool to turn the direction of time in a circle. Just one interpretation.
 


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