Energy from the difference of metals

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Falkon303

Member
Messages
171
I wrapped Magnesium in Aluminum, and Ferrocerium in Copper, and the readout was 1.5 volts roughly. It looks like it's slowly dropping, but I am unsure as to what is creating the voltage other than the elemental differences between the metals. It's also possible it's somehow creating an antenna and gathering ambient energy, but whatever it is I feel it's worth sharing the information. Please forgive the dirty dishes, it was an onion dip gone horribly wrong.IMG_20210710_031122407.jpg
 

Falkon303

Member
Messages
171
It's not Galvanic corrosion because there's not transport medium. There's no moisture or anything to allow for the transport/conductive path (ie: water).

"Requirements for Galvanic Corrosion: In order for galvanic corrosion to occur, three elements are required. A conductive electrolyte solution (e.g. water) must connect the two metals on a regular basis. The electrolyte solution creates a “conductive path”."
 

Falkon303

Member
Messages
171
It may have to do with how extremely dissimilar the materials are. I might experiment with the wrapping metals as well, there could likely be a way to increase the voltage.
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Falkon303

Member
Messages
171
update: so I tried this the next day, and I'm only getting millivolt readings. I was able to create this last night, but it may have had to do with the shape of the foil, direction, etc. It's interesting that there are millivolt readings at all, but I am guessing it was acting as an antenna of sorts.
 

Harte

Senior Member
Messages
4,150
It's not Galvanic corrosion because there's not transport medium. There's no moisture or anything to allow for the transport/conductive path (ie: water).

"Requirements for Galvanic Corrosion: In order for galvanic corrosion to occur, three elements are required. A conductive electrolyte solution (e.g. water) must connect the two metals on a regular basis. The electrolyte solution creates a “conductive path”."
There is ALWAYS moisture.
If you want, you can bury your connections in a desiccant and seal them off somehow and check what I'm telling you after some time passes. You'd need to put the meteals themselves in a desiccant as well before setting up your circuit.

Harte
 

Einstein

Temporal Engineer
Messages
4,113
There is ALWAYS moisture.
If you want, you can bury your connections in a desiccant and seal them off somehow and check what I'm telling you after some time passes. You'd need to put the meteals themselves in a desiccant as well before setting up your circuit.

Harte

Apparently a new battery technology has been developed by a startup company which uses a solid state battery technology, thus eliminating the need for a liquid electrolyte.

Did QuantumScape Just Solve a 40-Year-Old Battery Problem?
 

Falkon303

Member
Messages
171
There is ALWAYS moisture.
If you want, you can bury your connections in a desiccant and seal them off somehow and check what I'm telling you after some time passes. You'd need to put the meteals themselves in a desiccant as well before setting up your circuit.

Harte

There is always moisture in the air, but not enough ambient moisture to have 1.5 volts .
 

Harte

Senior Member
Messages
4,150
There is always moisture in the air, but not enough ambient moisture to have 1.5 volts .
Yes, there is enough moisture in the air. You can't flatly claim there isn't just because everywhere you look up "galvanic cell" they instruct you to put your metals in a solution.

Harte
 

Falkon303

Member
Messages
171
Yes, there is enough moisture in the air. You can't flatly claim there isn't just because everywhere you look up "galvanic cell" they instruct you to put your metals in a solution.

Harte
If there were enough moisture in the air you'd be able to do this with copper/aluminum or carbon/magnesium alone, and you can't, you get 0 volts.
 
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