Internet use 'good for the brain'

Num7

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Internet use 'good for the brain'

Internet use 'good for the brain'
14 October 2008
For middle aged and older people at least, using the internet helps boost brain power, research suggests.

A University of California Los Angeles team found searching the web stimulates centres in the brain that control decision-making and complex reasoning.

The researchers say this might even help to counter-act the age-related physiological changes that cause the brain to slow down.

The study features in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.

As the brain ages, a number of changes occur, including shrinkage and reductions in cell activity, which can impact on performance.

It has long been thought that activities which keep the brain active, such as crossword puzzles, may help minimise the impact - and the latest study suggests that surfing the web can be added to the list.

Lead researcher Professor Gary Small said: "The study results are encouraging, that emerging computerized technologies may have physiological effects and potential benefits for middle-aged and older adults.

"Internet searching engages complicated brain activity, which may help exercise and improve brain function."

The latest study was based on 24 volunteers aged between 55 and 76. Half were experienced internet users, the rest were not.

Compared with reading

Each volunteer underwent a brain scan while performing web searches and book-reading tasks.

Both types of task produced evidence of significant activity in regions of the brain controlling language, reading, memory and visual abilities.

However, the web search task produced significant additional activity in separate areas of the brain which control decision-making and complex reasoning - but only in those who were experienced web users.

The researchers said that compared with simple reading, the internet's wealth of choices requires that people make decisions about what to click on in order to get the relevant information.

However, they suggested that newcomers to the web had not quite grasped the strategies needed to successfully carry out a web search.

Professor Smith said: "A simple, everyday task like searching the web appears to enhance brain circuitry in older adults, demonstrating that our brains are sensitive and can continue to learn as we grow older."

Rebecca Wood, chief executive of the Alzheimer?s Research Trust, said: "These fascinating findings add to previous research suggesting that middle-aged and older people can reduce their risk of dementia by taking part in regular mentally stimulating activities.

"Older web users - 'silver surfers' - are doing precisely this.

"Frequent social interactions, regular exercise and maintaining a balanced diet can also reduce dementia risk."

Dr Susanne Sorensen, head of research at the Alzheimer's Society, said: "Use it or lose it may well be a positive message to keep people active but there is very little real evidence that keeping the brain exercised with puzzles, games or other activities can promote cognitive health and reduce the risk of dementia."
BBC
 

kcwildman

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Re: Internet use 'good for the brain'

use it or lose it
thats what I was always told so it sounds likely to me
 

Num7

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Re: Internet use 'good for the brain'

I'm not sure that internet is good for my brain!
I'm pretty much wasting my time online on forums and stuff like that instead of doing anything else. uh.
 

kcwildman

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3,049
Re: Internet use 'good for the brain'

iffin ya learn even one thing its not wasted time. knowlage is the most valueable thing you have. and almost the only thing that can't be stolen. but yeh I catch hell for sittin at the putor too.
 

jurgen36

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Re: Internet use 'good for the brain'

kc wildman said:
use it or lose it
thats what I was always told so it sounds likely to me

Correct, but the way it looks we might be loosing it soon anyway if it goes according to homeland insecure securities.

Regards
 

Keroscene

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Re: Internet use 'good for the brain'

jurgen36 said:
Correct, but the way it looks we might be loosing it soon anyway if it goes according to homeland insecure securities.

Regards

No opt-out of filtered Internet


No opt-out of filtered Internet. Australians will be unable to opt-out of the government's pending Internet content filtering scheme, and will instead be placed on a watered-down blacklist, experts say.

By Darren Pauli, Computerworld Australia
October 13, 2008
Australians will be unable to opt-out of the government's pending Internet content filtering scheme, and will instead be placed on a watered-down blacklist, experts say.
Under the government's $125.8 million Plan for Cyber-Safety, users can switch between two blacklists which block content inappropriate for children, and a separate list which blocks illegal material.
Pundits say consumers have been lulled into believing the opt-out proviso would remove content filtering altogether.
The government will iron-out policy and implementation of the Internet content filtering software following an upcoming trial of the technology, according to the Department of Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy.
Department spokesman Tim Marshall said the filters will be mandatory for all Australians.
"Labor's plan for cyber-safety will require ISPs to offer a clean feed Internet service to all homes, schools and public Internet points accessible by children," Marshall said.
"The upcoming field pilot of ISP filtering technology will look at various aspects of filtering, including effectiveness, ease of circumvention, the impact on internet access speeds and cost."
Internet Service Providers (ISPs) contacted by Computerworld say blanket content filtering will cripple Internet speeds because the technology is not up to scratch.
Online libertarians claim the blacklists could be expanded to censor material such as euthanasia, drugs and protest.
Internode network engineer Mark Newton said many users falsely believe the opt-out proviso will remove content filtering.
"Users can opt-out of the 'additional material' blacklist (referred to in a department press release, which is a list of things unsuitable for children, but there is no opt-out for 'illegal content'", Newton said.
"That is the way the testing was formulated, the way the upcoming live trials will run, and the way the policy is framed; to believe otherwise is to believe that a government department would go to the lengths of declaring that some kind of Internet content is illegal, then allow an opt-out.
"Illegal is illegal and if there is infrastructure in place to block it, then it will be required to be blocked -- end of story."
Newton said advisers to Communications Minister Stephen Conroy have told ISPs that Internet content filtering will be mandatory for all users.
The government reported it does not expected to prescribe which filtering technologies ISPs can use, and will only set blacklists of filtered content, supplied by the Australia Communications and Media Authority (ACMA).
EFA chair Dale Clapperton said in a previous article that Internet content filtering could lead to censorship of drugs, political dissident and other legal freedoms.
"Once the public has allowed the system to be established, it is much easier to block other material," Clapperton said.
According to preliminary trials, the best Internet content filters would incorrectly block about 10,0000 Web pages from one million.



No opt-out of filtered Internet | Computerworld Australia | October13, 2008 | Darren Pauli |
 

jurgen36

Member
Messages
204
Re: Internet use 'good for the brain'

Well then I will have to move to the North of Geraldton where I can have satellite access to the Asian com satellites. I can get satellite internet access with about 4 different ISP's in Asia.
So there is always a way out.
Regards
 

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