This may be Titor

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Judge Bean

Senior Member
Messages
1,257
This may be Titor

In my opinion, the one known as John Titor (as in ?yes, that?s a real name,? as he wrote) may be a middleaged technical publisher and inventor on the East Coast named Jonathan Titus.

In the first place, the name Titus has been linked to the Titor Foundation by research done by one of our members. In the second place, Titus was the inventor of what some claim was the first personal computer?clearly, the ?grandfather? of ?Titor? was the ?inventor? of the precursor of the IBM 5100.

The story is somewhat convoluted, and I apologize if some of it has already appeared here or on other sites. Suffice it to say that we should make a quick study of the ?addresses,? if we have any, of anyone we have suspected of being Titor. If they come out to connect us to Massachusetts, New Jersey, or New York, this will be one more piece of the puzzle, for these are Titus? stomping-grounds.

Quoting an internet source,

?In the March, 1974, issue of QST magazine there appeared the first advertisement for a "personal computer." It was called the Scelbi ...The second "personal computer kit" was the Mark-8 (also Intel 8008 based) designed by Jonathan Titus. The July issue of Radio Electronics magazine published an article on building a Mark-8 microcomputer, information the general public was hungry for. ...?

And another:

?Hobbyists have always been an integral part of the electronics world, and every so often one hobbyist comes along who makes a real impact within the industry. In Jonathan Titus? case, he was a computing hobbyist who wanted to build a computer for himself at a time when the smallest computers were Digital Equipment PDP-8 series machines. Titus successfully built a computer, the Mark-8, in 1973, based on an Intel 8008 microprocessor. The Mark-8 may not have been the very first home-built computer ever completed, but it was the first to be written up in a national magazine and converted into a kit design so that many other hobbyists could follow in Titus? footsteps. While there is no documented proof of a link, it is possible that the Mark-8 may have gone on to inspire other systems designers like Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak, who designed the Apple I in Jobs? garage.

"....In 1973, Titus purchased three 8008 chips for $125 each. Because he had no way to read or write PROM (programmable read-only memory) chips, Titus instead developed a front panel with switch controls and indicators. The switches acted as individual bits, and by manipulating the switch array, he could create small programs to allow the use of a keyboard or display device.

"Surprisingly, Titus? first attempt at a prototype design worked. The computer featured three banks of 256-byte memory. While applying decals to the system, Titus realized that the system needed a name, and since the computer relied on Intel?s 8-bit processor, he named it the Mark-8.

"Titus pitched an article on the Mark-8 to Popular Electronics magazine and was rejected. Fortunately, Radio-Electronics magazine liked the project and agreed to publish an article on it, including circuit board layouts and how to assemble the system. A supplemental instruction book advertised in the magazine sold several thousand copies.

"'Experimenters realized they could have their own computer, and in fact, such a computer was simple, relatively inexpensive, and easy to build and use,' says Titus. 'Although few if any ?application? programs existed in 1974, the Mark-8 gave people a way to learn about computers first hand. It blazed a trail for others to follow.'?


Mr. Titus is also very much interested in current events, politics, crime, and the End of the World?if his reviews on Amazon is any indication of his interests. Consider the following examples, the last one of which is a letter to the editor of his hometown newspaper:


"Reviewer: Jon Titus from Milford, MA United States
Not much of a plot, not much action.

(From Amazon.com?a description of this novel which Titus didn?t like at all:
"With occasional references to "the Kursk incident" and to Vladimir Putin's unpopularity with the Russian people, and with a plot centered around the antics of an ultra-nationalist Russian general, Dead Hand positions itself as an up-to-the-minute thriller with significant political resonance--and even throws in a natural disaster for good measure. Ever wary of being caught off-guard by a nuclear strike, Russia has carefully cultivated a retaliatory system capable of launching its own missiles: mordantly dubbed Dead Hand, the system will activate without a central command. When an asteroid hits Siberia with enough force to trigger the system, Moscow finds itself faced with both unspeakable environmental chaos and General Likatchev's bid to subvert the disaster to his own anti-Western purposes.
Politics makes strange bedfellows, and Russia must ask the U.S., NATO, and the French Foreign Legion (to name but a few of the players) to invade its own borders and destroy the missiles before Likatchev can get to them. Confronted by mass destruction and a Russian squadron led by one of the general's former prot?g?s, the motley group of Western soldiers races against the clock toward the bevy of silos--but at what cost?

"Harold Coyle is anything but subtle: his characters can't cross a room without the author pausing to reflect on the glory of the soldier's calling. His pedantic asides often bring the plot to a screeching halt, and he has an unfortunate tendency to present his characters in the manner of an announcer at a beauty pageant: heavy on the platitudes and light on meaningful revelation. That said, Coyle has built up a loyal following, and these readers will no doubt be pleased with the obvious au courant sincerity of his latest offering." --Kelly Flynn)


He much prefers reading about real disasters:

"Inviting Disaster: Lessons from the Edge of Technology by James R. Chiles
"Great book, but illustrations lacking, December 18, 2001 Every engineer or scientist should put this title on their "must read" list. Chiles' interesting explanations and descriptions of accidents waiting to happen often sent chills up my spine. Readers can see trouble brewing. Too bad the participants didn't.
The book suffers, though, from poor illustrations. There's not a photo in the book that shows either the components involved in the various disasters or the aftermath of these disasters. The lack of photos makes the various events seem almost surreal. The simple 2-D line drawings don't convey much information. The figure showing the Three Mile Island reactor, for example, describes a condensate valve and relief valve, but the illustration doesn't point them out.

"The book has a couple of minor technical errors. The author refers to Sevin and Temik as herbicides. Actually, they're insecticides. He also mentiones cleaning a gunky trimer out of a pipe. Unless you know what a trimer is--three molecules of the same substance--this unexplained term may leave you scratching your head.
Overall a very good book. I recommend it highly."

Letter: That $500M belongs to the taxpayers
Milford Daily News Saturday, June 12, 2004

"The announcement of a $500 million budget surplus ("Surplus $100 million may go to towns," Milford Daily News, June 4, 2004) has set off a spending spree in the statehouse. Given Governor Romney's plans to return $100 million to cities and towns and individual legislators' pet projects, that money won't last long.
Taxpayers should remember the $500 million surplus came out of their pockets. Just because the Commonwealth collected that money from us, it should not have the right to spend it. Instead of an amendment that redefines marriage, we need one that demands fiscal responsibility from government.

"That "extra" $500 million should get refunded to the people and companies that paid it. If government needs more money, legislators should ask for it -- and taxpayers should have the opportunity to vote on those requests.
JON TITUS, Milford"


He holds higher degrees in chemistry, and his original ?Mark 8? personal computer is at the Smithsonian?sitting forever in a straight line from pulp fiction and the back pages of comics to Gates? Forty Billion?but, of course, passing him by. The psychology of the story makes a compelling case for the identification of this man as Titor, if nothing else did. Having been passed by by history, he prophecies the end of it, meanwhile reading Clancy-type novels and bitching about the government in his spare time.

Plus, he?s in the publishing business, and his contribution to science existed nowhere really but as blueprints in a magazine. A prototype put together in a garage, a footnote in the grand epic of intellectual history. It must hurt badly. Notice his nitpicking and plain language; and his desire for hands-on pictures and photos.

In summary, he is a writer, apocalyptic dreamer, and professional writer/editor/reader. In fact, he is three or four out of the five-person Titor ?committee? I proposed.

Again, if he has been the subject of speculation or discussion before now, I apologize
 

CaryP

Senior Member
Messages
1,438
This may be Titor

Paul,

I think you've seized on something profound here. I've never seen this analysis, and I think you may have something major. Wait until the anomalies site jumps all over this. We may have confirmation. LOL Excellent work pal. I knew that someone of intellignece would come up with a thorough analysis of the Titor drama. Thanks and Happy New Year. I'll raise one for you tonight and on New Year's Eve. YOU DA MAN PAUL!!!

Cary
 

hellrazor

Junior Member
Messages
78
This may be Titor

k i dont know much about titor but wasnt he born in another timeline, john titus could be anyone could prolly find someone with titus name in phonebook or similar name tht would fit him.

whered u find this information ??
 

GVT12

New Member
Messages
22
This may be Titor

Originally posted by Paul J. Lyon@Dec 27 2004, 04:19 PM
In my opinion, the one known as John Titor (as in ?yes, that?s a real name,? as he wrote) is a middleaged technical publisher and inventor on the East Coast named Jonathan Titus.

In the first place, the name Titus has been linked to the Titor Foundation by research done by one of our members. In the second place, Titus was the inventor of what some claim was the first personal computer?clearly, the ?grandfather? of ?Titor? was the ?inventor? of the precursor of the IBM 5100.

The story is somewhat convoluted, and I apologize if some of it has already appeared here or on other sites. Suffice it to say that we should make a quick study of the ?addresses,? if we have any, of anyone we have suspected of being Titor. If they come out to connect us to Massachusetts, New Jersey, or New York, this will be one more piece of the puzzle, for these are Titus? stomping-grounds.

Quoting an internet source,

?In the March, 1974, issue of QST magazine there appeared the first advertisement for a \"personal computer.\" It was called the Scelbi ...The second \"personal computer kit\" was the Mark-8 (also Intel 8008 based) designed by Jonathan Titus. The July issue of Radio Electronics magazine published an article on building a Mark-8 microcomputer, information the general public was hungry for. ...?

And another:

?Hobbyists have always been an integral part of the electronics world, and every so often one hobbyist comes along who makes a real impact within the industry. In Jonathan Titus? case, he was a computing hobbyist who wanted to build a computer for himself at a time when the smallest computers were Digital Equipment PDP-8 series machines. Titus successfully built a computer, the Mark-8, in 1973, based on an Intel 8008 microprocessor. The Mark-8 may not have been the very first home-built computer ever completed, but it was the first to be written up in a national magazine and converted into a kit design so that many other hobbyists could follow in Titus? footsteps. While there is no documented proof of a link, it is possible that the Mark-8 may have gone on to inspire other systems designers like Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak, who designed the Apple I in Jobs? garage.

\"....In 1973, Titus purchased three 8008 chips for $125 each. Because he had no way to read or write PROM (programmable read-only memory) chips, Titus instead developed a front panel with switch controls and indicators. The switches acted as individual bits, and by manipulating the switch array, he could create small programs to allow the use of a keyboard or display device.

\"Surprisingly, Titus? first attempt at a prototype design worked. The computer featured three banks of 256-byte memory. While applying decals to the system, Titus realized that the system needed a name, and since the computer relied on Intel?s 8-bit processor, he named it the Mark-8.

\"Titus pitched an article on the Mark-8 to Popular Electronics magazine and was rejected. Fortunately, Radio-Electronics magazine liked the project and agreed to publish an article on it, including circuit board layouts and how to assemble the system. A supplemental instruction book advertised in the magazine sold several thousand copies.

\"'Experimenters realized they could have their own computer, and in fact, such a computer was simple, relatively inexpensive, and easy to build and use,' says Titus. 'Although few if any ?application? programs existed in 1974, the Mark-8 gave people a way to learn about computers first hand. It blazed a trail for others to follow.'?


Mr. Titus is also very much interested in current events, politics, crime, and the End of the World?if his reviews on Amazon is any indication of his interests. Consider the following examples, the last one of which is a letter to the editor of his hometown newspaper:


\"Reviewer: Jon Titus from Milford, MA United States
Not much of a plot, not much action.

(From Amazon.com?a description of this novel which Titus didn?t like at all:
\"With occasional references to \"the Kursk incident\" and to Vladimir Putin's unpopularity with the Russian people, and with a plot centered around the antics of an ultra-nationalist Russian general, Dead Hand positions itself as an up-to-the-minute thriller with significant political resonance--and even throws in a natural disaster for good measure. Ever wary of being caught off-guard by a nuclear strike, Russia has carefully cultivated a retaliatory system capable of launching its own missiles: mordantly dubbed Dead Hand, the system will activate without a central command. When an asteroid hits Siberia with enough force to trigger the system, Moscow finds itself faced with both unspeakable environmental chaos and General Likatchev's bid to subvert the disaster to his own anti-Western purposes.
Politics makes strange bedfellows, and Russia must ask the U.S., NATO, and the French Foreign Legion (to name but a few of the players) to invade its own borders and destroy the missiles before Likatchev can get to them. Confronted by mass destruction and a Russian squadron led by one of the general's former prot?g?s, the motley group of Western soldiers races against the clock toward the bevy of silos--but at what cost?

\"Harold Coyle is anything but subtle: his characters can't cross a room without the author pausing to reflect on the glory of the soldier's calling. His pedantic asides often bring the plot to a screeching halt, and he has an unfortunate tendency to present his characters in the manner of an announcer at a beauty pageant: heavy on the platitudes and light on meaningful revelation. That said, Coyle has built up a loyal following, and these readers will no doubt be pleased with the obvious au courant sincerity of his latest offering.\" --Kelly Flynn)


He much prefers reading about real disasters:

\"Inviting Disaster: Lessons from the Edge of Technology by James R. Chiles
\"Great book, but illustrations lacking, December 18, 2001 Every engineer or scientist should put this title on their \"must read\" list. Chiles' interesting explanations and descriptions of accidents waiting to happen often sent chills up my spine. Readers can see trouble brewing. Too bad the participants didn't.
The book suffers, though, from poor illustrations. There's not a photo in the book that shows either the components involved in the various disasters or the aftermath of these disasters. The lack of photos makes the various events seem almost surreal. The simple 2-D line drawings don't convey much information. The figure showing the Three Mile Island reactor, for example, describes a condensate valve and relief valve, but the illustration doesn't point them out.

\"The book has a couple of minor technical errors. The author refers to Sevin and Temik as herbicides. Actually, they're insecticides. He also mentiones cleaning a gunky trimer out of a pipe. Unless you know what a trimer is--three molecules of the same substance--this unexplained term may leave you scratching your head.
Overall a very good book. I recommend it highly.\"

Letter: That $500M belongs to the taxpayers
Milford Daily News Saturday, June 12, 2004

\"The announcement of a $500 million budget surplus (\"Surplus $100 million may go to towns,\" Milford Daily News, June 4, 2004) has set off a spending spree in the statehouse. Given Governor Romney's plans to return $100 million to cities and towns and individual legislators' pet projects, that money won't last long.
Taxpayers should remember the $500 million surplus came out of their pockets. Just because the Commonwealth collected that money from us, it should not have the right to spend it. Instead of an amendment that redefines marriage, we need one that demands fiscal responsibility from government.

\"That \"extra\" $500 million should get refunded to the people and companies that paid it. If government needs more money, legislators should ask for it -- and taxpayers should have the opportunity to vote on those requests.
JON TITUS, Milford\"


He holds higher degrees in chemistry, and his original ?Mark 8? personal computer is at the Smithsonian?sitting forever in a straight line from pulp fiction and the back pages of comics to Gates? Forty Billion?but, of course, passing him by. The psychology of the story makes a compelling case for the identification of this man as Titor, if nothing else did. Having been passed by by history, he prophecies the end of it, meanwhile reading Clancy-type novels and bitching about the government in his spare time.

Plus, he?s in the publishing business, and his contribution to science existed nowhere really but as blueprints in a magazine. A prototype put together in a garage, a footnote in the grand epic of intellectual history. It must hurt badly. Notice his nitpicking and plain language; and his desire for hands-on pictures and photos.

In summary, he is a writer, apocalyptic dreamer, and professional writer/editor/reader. In fact, he is three or four out of the five-person Titor ?committee? I proposed.

Again, if he has been the subject of speculation or discussion before now, I apologize
Most Excellent Find ;)

Good Job Paul!

Google has pleanty on the subject as well...
mark8bw.gif

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&q=J...tus&btnG=Search
 
Messages
229
This may be Titor

Originally posted by GVT12+Dec 28 2004, 08:04 AM--><div class='quotemain'><!--QuoteBegin-Paul J. Lyon@Dec 27 2004, 04:19 PM
In my opinion, the one known as John Titor (as in ?yes, that?s a real name,? as he wrote) is a middleaged technical publisher and inventor on the East Coast named Jonathan Titus.?

In the first place, the name Titus has been linked to the Titor Foundation by research done by one of our members.? In the second place, Titus was the inventor of what some claim was the first personal computer?clearly, the ?grandfather? of ?Titor? was the ?inventor? of the precursor of the IBM 5100.

The story is somewhat convoluted, and I apologize if some of it has already appeared here or on other sites.? Suffice it to say that we should make a quick study of the ?addresses,? if we have any, of anyone we have suspected of being Titor.? If they come out to connect us to Massachusetts, New Jersey, or New York, this will be one more piece of the puzzle, for these are Titus? stomping-grounds.

Quoting an internet source,

?In the March, 1974, issue of QST magazine there appeared the first advertisement for a "personal computer." It was called the Scelbi ...The second "personal computer kit" was the Mark-8 (also Intel 8008 based) designed by Jonathan Titus. The July issue of Radio Electronics magazine published an article on building a Mark-8 microcomputer, information the general public was hungry for. ...?

And another:

?Hobbyists have always been an integral part of the electronics world, and every so often one hobbyist comes along who makes a real impact within the industry. In Jonathan Titus? case, he was a computing hobbyist who wanted to build a computer for himself at a time when the smallest computers were Digital Equipment PDP-8 series machines. Titus successfully built a computer, the Mark-8, in 1973, based on an Intel 8008 microprocessor. The Mark-8 may not have been the very first home-built computer ever completed, but it was the first to be written up in a national magazine and converted into a kit design so that many other hobbyists could follow in Titus? footsteps. While there is no documented proof of a link, it is possible that the Mark-8 may have gone on to inspire other systems designers like Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak, who designed the Apple I in Jobs? garage.

"....In 1973, Titus purchased three 8008 chips for $125 each. Because he had no way to read or write PROM (programmable read-only memory) chips, Titus instead developed a front panel with switch controls and indicators. The switches acted as individual bits, and by manipulating the switch array, he could create small programs to allow the use of a keyboard or display device.

"Surprisingly, Titus? first attempt at a prototype design worked. The computer featured three banks of 256-byte memory. While applying decals to the system, Titus realized that the system needed a name, and since the computer relied on Intel?s 8-bit processor, he named it the Mark-8.

"Titus pitched an article on the Mark-8 to Popular Electronics magazine and was rejected. Fortunately, Radio-Electronics magazine liked the project and agreed to publish an article on it, including circuit board layouts and how to assemble the system. A supplemental instruction book advertised in the magazine sold several thousand copies.

"'Experimenters realized they could have their own computer, and in fact, such a computer was simple, relatively inexpensive, and easy to build and use,' says Titus. 'Although few if any ?application? programs existed in 1974, the Mark-8 gave people a way to learn about computers first hand. It blazed a trail for others to follow.'?


Mr. Titus is also very much interested in current events, politics, crime, and the End of the World?if his reviews on Amazon is any indication of his interests.? Consider the following examples, the last one of which is a letter to the editor of his hometown newspaper:


"Reviewer: Jon Titus from Milford, MA United States
Not much of a plot, not much action.

(From Amazon.com?a description of this novel which Titus didn?t like at all:
"With occasional references to "the Kursk incident" and to Vladimir Putin's unpopularity with the Russian people, and with a plot centered around the antics of an ultra-nationalist Russian general, Dead Hand positions itself as an up-to-the-minute thriller with significant political resonance--and even throws in a natural disaster for good measure. Ever wary of being caught off-guard by a nuclear strike, Russia has carefully cultivated a retaliatory system capable of launching its own missiles: mordantly dubbed Dead Hand, the system will activate without a central command. When an asteroid hits Siberia with enough force to trigger the system, Moscow finds itself faced with both unspeakable environmental chaos and General Likatchev's bid to subvert the disaster to his own anti-Western purposes.
Politics makes strange bedfellows, and Russia must ask the U.S., NATO, and the French Foreign Legion (to name but a few of the players) to invade its own borders and destroy the missiles before Likatchev can get to them. Confronted by mass destruction and a Russian squadron led by one of the general's former prot?g?s, the motley group of Western soldiers races against the clock toward the bevy of silos--but at what cost?

"Harold Coyle is anything but subtle: his characters can't cross a room without the author pausing to reflect on the glory of the soldier's calling. His pedantic asides often bring the plot to a screeching halt, and he has an unfortunate tendency to present his characters in the manner of an announcer at a beauty pageant: heavy on the platitudes and light on meaningful revelation. That said, Coyle has built up a loyal following, and these readers will no doubt be pleased with the obvious au courant sincerity of his latest offering." --Kelly Flynn)


He much prefers reading about real disasters:

"Inviting Disaster: Lessons from the Edge of Technology by James R. Chiles
"Great book, but illustrations lacking, December 18, 2001 Every engineer or scientist should put this title on their "must read" list. Chiles' interesting explanations and descriptions of accidents waiting to happen often sent chills up my spine. Readers can see trouble brewing. Too bad the participants didn't.
The book suffers, though, from poor illustrations. There's not a photo in the book that shows either the components involved in the various disasters or the aftermath of these disasters. The lack of photos makes the various events seem almost surreal. The simple 2-D line drawings don't convey much information. The figure showing the Three Mile Island reactor, for example, describes a condensate valve and relief valve, but the illustration doesn't point them out.

"The book has a couple of minor technical errors. The author refers to Sevin and Temik as herbicides. Actually, they're insecticides. He also mentiones cleaning a gunky trimer out of a pipe. Unless you know what a trimer is--three molecules of the same substance--this unexplained term may leave you scratching your head.
Overall a very good book. I recommend it highly."

Letter: That $500M belongs to the taxpayers
Milford Daily News Saturday, June 12, 2004

"The announcement of a $500 million budget surplus ("Surplus $100 million may go to towns," Milford Daily News, June 4, 2004) has set off a spending spree in the statehouse. Given Governor Romney's plans to return $100 million to cities and towns and individual legislators' pet projects, that money won't last long.
Taxpayers should remember the $500 million surplus came out of their pockets. Just because the Commonwealth collected that money from us, it should not have the right to spend it. Instead of an amendment that redefines marriage, we need one that demands fiscal responsibility from government.

"That "extra" $500 million should get refunded to the people and companies that paid it. If government needs more money, legislators should ask for it -- and taxpayers should have the opportunity to vote on those requests.
JON TITUS, Milford"


He holds higher degrees in chemistry, and his original ?Mark 8? personal computer is at the Smithsonian?sitting forever in a straight line from pulp fiction and the back pages of comics to Gates? Forty Billion?but, of course, passing him by.? The psychology of the story makes a compelling case for the identification of this man as Titor, if nothing else did.? Having been passed by by history, he prophecies the end of it, meanwhile reading Clancy-type novels and bitching about the government in his spare time.

Plus, he?s in the publishing business, and his contribution to science existed nowhere really but as blueprints in a magazine.? A prototype put together in a garage, a footnote in the grand epic of intellectual history.? It must hurt badly.? Notice his nitpicking and plain language; and his desire for hands-on pictures and photos.

In summary, he is a writer, apocalyptic dreamer, and professional writer/editor/reader.? In fact, he is three or four out of the five-person Titor ?committee? I proposed.

Again, if he has been the subject of speculation or discussion before now, I apologize
Most Excellent Find ;)

Good Job Paul!

Google has pleanty on the subject as well...
mark8bw.gif

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&q=J...tus&btnG=Search
[snapback]19050[/snapback]​
[/b][/quote]


Very interesting, i have heard of a Jonathan Titus before, i think i read something about him in a mechanical technology magazine, ill see if i can find the name and get the magazine and the article he is in. I wonder why he didn't travel back to 2036, even though it wont be his line, he could still develope a way to get back, since from what i read, his machine generate kerr black holes around his machine, thus using a gravitational effect to travel through time, thing is, it bends space as well, and the gravitational distortion effects of the black holes threw it through several different universes before throwing it here. There are other uses for black holes as well, including creating wormholes for interstellar travel, i have two ideas for this, the first one involves constructing 4 particle accelerators in space, in orbit around the earth. All four accelerators will then use very high powered magnetic fields to accelerate particles at the point of impact, 4 particles should hit all at once, thus releasing energy spread out over a large area. There should be a mini-black hole created, but it will evaporate in just fractions of a second. There should still be a "dampening" in where the black hole used to be, thus there should still be some gravity generated, then it pulls in the energy from the collision, thus generating a wormhole, you can use directed magnetic fields to make it larger. The "slipstream", what is inside the wormhole that thrusts you to your location, will end at where there is a gravity well, planet, star, etc. Now, im going to admit, i dont know myself if this theory or my next one will work, this one involves using massive tesla coils in space, throwing enormous amounts of electrical energy at a certain point, you can use either two or four tesla coils constructed in space for the effect, technically, the electrons and some atoms will all be thrown at each other in a concentrated area, then you generate very high electro-magnetic fields and concentrate them on the concentrated area of atoms, this will make them more dense, thus allowing it to collaspe upon itself, creating a tear in space, which will in turn generate a wormhole. I do not know myself if this will work, i got both ideas from a Scientific American magazine back in 2000. It was about CERN and the new Large Hadron Collider, and a theory about if they collide two particles fast enough, it will create a mini-black hole which will evaporate in a fraction of a second.
 

CaryP

Senior Member
Messages
1,438
This may be Titor

Very interesting, i have heard of a Jonathan Titus before, i think i read something about him in a mechanical technology magazine, ill see if i can find the name and get the magazine and the article he is in. I wonder why he didn't travel back to 2036, even though it wont be his line, he could still develope a way to get back, since from what i read, his machine generate kerr black holes around his machine, thus using a gravitational effect to travel through time, thing is, it bends space as well, and the gravitational distortion effects of the black holes threw it through several different universes before throwing it here. There are other uses for black holes as well, including creating wormholes for interstellar travel, i have two ideas for this, the first one involves constructing 4 particle accelerators in space, in orbit around the earth. All four accelerators will then use very high powered magnetic fields to accelerate particles at the point of impact, 4 particles should hit all at once, thus releasing energy spread out over a large area. There should be a mini-black hole created, but it will evaporate in just fractions of a second. There should still be a \"dampening\" in where the black hole used to be, thus there should still be some gravity generated, then it pulls in the energy from the collision, thus generating a wormhole, you can use directed magnetic fields to make it larger. The \"slipstream\", what is inside the wormhole that thrusts you to your location, will end at where there is a gravity well, planet, star, etc. Now, im going to admit, i dont know myself if this theory or my next one will work, this one involves using massive tesla coils in space, throwing enormous amounts of electrical energy at a certain point, you can use either two or four tesla coils constructed in space for the effect, technically, the electrons and some atoms will all be thrown at each other in a concentrated area, then you generate very high electro-magnetic fields and concentrate them on the concentrated area of atoms, this will make them more dense, thus allowing it to collaspe upon itself, creating a tear in space, which will in turn generate a wormhole. I do not know myself if this will work, i got both ideas from a Scientific American magazine back in 2000. It was about CERN and the new Large Hadron Collider, and a theory about if they collide two particles fast enough, it will create a mini-black hole which will evaporate in a fraction of a second.

So now you're trying to show you're a time traveler by hitching your wagon to Paul's research? Yeah, that about fits. Why don't you tell us all about Jonathan Titus in 2036. He came back to the 1970's and invented the PC so we could all chat with him on the net in 2000 and 2001 and then keep his legend alive into 2005 and beyond. Bet he's having a good laugh back in 2036. You TT boys really crack me. Paul's research is about identifying who perpetrated the Titor myth. You wanna turn into evidence that you read about the guy in the future, and wonder why he didn't return to 2036 along with some other "scientific stuff." Classic. I'd love to see a magazine article from the future about Titus so you can show us "when" you're from. I can see it now "When Did John Titus Go?" in the February 2037 issue of your magazine. Oh wait, you can go to the past and get a copy of the article Paul referenced. That'd be proof you really do time travel too. That'd really make me smile.

Cary
 

Judge Bean

Senior Member
Messages
1,257
This may be Titor

It seems to me that Malaki has misunderstood my post, and believes that I am pointing to Jonathan Titus, a contemporary, as a timetraveler. I hope that no one else has this misconception. Titus may well be a timetraveler, but it seems more likely to me that he may be someone who has foisted a dream invention onto the public for the second time, this time placing himself securely outside of history in order to be safe from its incessant oblivion.
 
Messages
229
This may be Titor

Originally posted by Paul J. Lyon@Dec 28 2004, 01:19 PM
It seems to me that Malaki has misunderstood my post, and believes that I am pointing to Jonathan Titus, a contemporary, as a timetraveler. I hope that no one else has this misconception. Titus may well be a timetraveler, but it seems more likely to me that he is someone who has foisted a dream invention onto the public for the second time, this time placing himself securely outside of history in order to be safe from its incessant oblivion.

I apologize if i misunderstood, the similarities between Titus and Titor are striking, and the name Jonathan Titus sounded familar when i heard it in the post, i do remember reading about his name in a magazine article, later on today ill search my shelf where i keep Scientific American, and Popular Mechanics, as i remember more, i think it was a Popular Mechanics magazine article i read about him, and the article was about computers, and i have a nice large stack of those magazines, some dating back before 2000. It may take a while, but i believe i can find the article, and i'll post it here. After all, both names may be part of one giant series of coincedences, like the JFK and Lincoln coincedences.
 

Judge Bean

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This may be Titor

Originally posted by Traveler Malaki+Dec 28 2004, 08:10 PM--><div class='quotemain'><!--QuoteBegin-Paul J. Lyon@Dec 28 2004, 01:19 PM
It seems to me that Malaki has misunderstood my post, and believes that I am pointing to Jonathan Titus, a contemporary, as a timetraveler.? I hope that no one else has this misconception.? Titus may well be a timetraveler, but it seems more likely to me that he is someone who has foisted a dream invention onto the public for the second time, this time placing himself securely outside of history in order to be safe from its incessant oblivion.

I apologize if i misunderstood, the similarities between Titus and Titor are striking, and the name Jonathan Titus sounded familar when i heard it in the post, i do remember reading about his name in a magazine article, later on today ill search my shelf where i keep Scientific American, and Popular Mechanics, as i remember more, i think it was a Popular Mechanics magazine article i read about him, and the article was about computers, and i have a nice large stack of those magazines, some dating back before 2000. It may take a while, but i believe i can find the article, and i'll post it here. After all, both names may be part of one giant series of coincedences, like the JFK and Lincoln coincedences.
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Yes, you will no doubt find him mentioned often in those kind of publications over the past few years. He is the subject of a few dozen Google hits, also. He is not in hiding or trying to conceal his identity in any way. He holds a relatively important place in the history of invention, though his accomplishment was derivative (as many such are) and has been somewhat overshadowed by what others did later, perhaps following his lead.

I am left a little bit confused by your response. It seems that you have interpreted the Titus-Titor connection as some sort of mystical, shrouded fact, when it is simply something hiding in plain sight, apparently previously overlooked, and which answers a great many questions and puzzles with an elegant economy of resolution-- in sum, something which should make all of us slap ourselves upon the forehead and ask how we could have missed it up to now.

Of course, it might turn out in the end that Titus is an actual timetraveler, or used by one to channel disinformation to the public, or an alien from another galaxy here to spread chaos to prepare us for invasion of the body snatchers. Your guess is as good as mine.

Being Titor is not all that exciting, actually, and the proposition of the Titus secret identity has just the right touch of banality to make it highly credible. This is because it was never about Titor; it was always about time travel.
 

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