Debate What is the very nature of Time?

Kairos

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@Kairos but going back to one of your other posts.

if its not discovered and at this time how can you rule out a multiverse?

At some point in the future are you not predicting the future in saying it has to be proven today?

anyway whats your credentials for proving otherwise?

I did not rule it out. I just said I do not personally believe it based on parsimony alone but, if somebody were to actually prove that interpretation, then I would change my mind.

What these so-called "skeptics" do, which is fallacious, is to claim something does not exist because nobody proved it. That's obviously nonsense since anything we recently discovered still existed before we discovered it.
 

TimeFlipper

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I think you are talking about neutrinos.
There are areas of quantum physics that seem to show that quantium states of subatomic particles are influenced by future events, so there may be some validity to what you remember. But I think what you're remembering is what's called superposition. That's where a particle assumes the quantum state of another particle. There are three kinds of neutrinos, but every neutrino assumes the quantum state of the other two kinds, morphing from one kind into another.

But you can bet that neutrinos aren't interfering or in any way reacting with the protons (and ionized nuclei) in the beams used by Cern. Neutrinos don't interact with anything. WAY too small and practically massless. That's why detectors have to be far underground, to try and eliminate "hits" caused by other particles.

Harte
I take your points Hartey, but if those particles, what ever they might be, are continually flowing through every part of our Earth, it would seem logical that at some moment in time, they too would be flowing across the beams in CERN`s collidor, and even having some form of influence in the past, during the moment the two beans collide with each other....

Those particles could be on some kind of "mission", maybe they were "programmed" by something or someone in the future, to purposely create "events" in the past, so that the future benefits, or doesnt from them....You made it tantalisingly more interesting to me now Hartey...Thanks for the input (y) :)..
 

Harte

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Neutrinos do not interact with other particles. They are practically massless and are orders of magnitude smaller than a proton.
You can't make up physics to try and support an idea.

Harte
 

TimeFlipper

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Neutrinos do not interact with other particles. They are practically massless and are orders of magnitude smaller than a proton.
You can't make up physics to try and support an idea.

Harte
Particle physics tell me neutrinos were originally difficult to locate, since they interact very weakly with other particles, which strongly suggests to my ignorance on such matters, that there is some form of interaction, however weak it might be....Also, particle physicists used to believe that neutrinos were massless, but since then they have obviously been educated :cool:..

Remembering that the collder at CERN is 575 feet underground, i assume that apart from digging that deep to use the Earths crust as a defence against radiation, and wanting to preserve the aesthetics of the natural landscape (sic)....That depth would prevent the penetration of many particles, but certainly not our wonderful little friend, the Neutrino :D..
 

Harte

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If you ran 100 billion runs of proton beam experiments at CERN, you might get one interaction with an external neutrino involved.

Harte
 

TimeFlipper

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If you ran 100 billion runs of proton beam experiments at CERN, you might get one interaction with an external neutrino involved.

Harte
Its irrelevant if i ran 1000 billion runs of proton beams, neutrinos do interact with other particles..End Of :D..
 
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TimeFlipper

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Another Question...
What do you think of the Higgs Boson, and Field?
I prefer to believe in what Stephen Hawkins said, that the Higgs Boson is potentially extremely dangerous!....As for the Higgs Field, you can find that along with the Higgs Boson, if you go onto your browser and type in, "Stephen Hawkin Fears Higgs Boson Doomsday, And Hes Not Alone" :eek:..
 
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kcwildman

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time is a funny concept indeed. we as humans live from point A to B, yet if we do not move no time has passed.
all time, is an amount of distance observed by the traveler . it is the only way we have to explain our life from birth to death.
sadly we only use a set of rules put together by observing a set rate of radioactive decay under the exact and very limited conditions which we live in here on earth, sooooooo
if we change the conditions for said object we change the rate of decay for said object . so when the rate of decay is changed because those conditions no longer apply.
poof !!!!!!! time is no longer connected to distance traveled by said object at a set speed, or the rate of radioactive decay of said object under those specific conditions.
time has no meaning
time is the construct of our peanut brains
yes my ole friend Harte, it is relative only to the observer.
but then again, this is just the babblings of one who swings about in the trees, and wears only a bit of a rag to cover his ass. a wise man once said I know that I do not know
 
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TimeFlipper

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I'll let you know in 500 billion years.

Harte
Take it up with Particle Physicists Hartey, if they tell me that Neutrinos "do" interact with other particles, contrary to yourself, who do "you" think iam going to believe in? ;)....You were wrong Hartey, stop arguing and live with it :D..
 

Einstein

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Fermi Lab has a very large neutrino detector. They are currently conducting the DUNE experiment. There is talk that neutrinos can oscillate between one type and another. A suspected property that could lead to why the universe is comprised of matter without an equal amount of antimatter. Check out this video with Don Lincoln as narrator.

 

Treversal

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Fermi Lab has a very large neutrino detector. They are currently conducting the DUNE experiment. There is talk that neutrinos can oscillate between one type and another. A suspected property that could lead to why the universe is comprised of matter without an equal amount of antimatter. Check out this video with Don Lincoln as narrator.

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Harte

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Take it up with Particle Physicists Hartey, if they tell me that Neutrinos "do" interact with other particles, contrary to yourself, who do "you" think iam going to believe in? ;)....You were wrong Hartey, stop arguing and live with it :D..
They could interact somewhat. But having a quintillionth of the mass of a proton, and a quadrillionth of the size, the interaction may not even be noticeable and thus it's not worth talking about.

Besides, I stated earlier that interactions could occur.

Any physicist will tell you the same thing.

Harte
 

TimeFlipper

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Neutrinos do not interact with other particles. They are practically massless and are orders of magnitude smaller than a proton.
You can't make up physics to try and support an idea.

Harte
Hartey, i have used this posting to remind you of what you stated previously, "Neutrinos do not interact with other particles!"....Now you can see why physics CAN support my own concepts sometimes ;):D..
 

Harte

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Hartey, i have used this posting to remind you of what you stated previously, "Neutrinos do not interact with other particles!"....Now you can see why physics CAN support my own concepts sometimes ;):D..
Essentially, neutrinos don't interact with anything.
Obviously there has to be some rare interactions or they wouldn't have been detected, right?
You failed to mention this post:
If you ran 100 billion runs of proton beam experiments at CERN, you might get one interaction with an external neutrino involved.

Harte
Even if it happened, that interaction would not be detectable. Because of the difference in masses.

So, essentially no. Neutrinos don't interact with anything. Any interactions are too rare for words like "interact."

Harte
 

TimeFlipper

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Essentially, neutrinos don't interact with anything.
Obviously there has to be some rare interactions or they wouldn't have been detected, right?
You failed to mention this post:

Even if it happened, that interaction would not be detectable. Because of the difference in masses.

So, essentially no. Neutrinos don't interact with anything. Any interactions are too rare for words like "interact."

Harte
Iam very pleased that you did bring up your previous posting where you, "reluctantly" did agree with me that Neutrinos obviously "do" exist, or they wouldnt have been detected!...So there we are, Neutrinos, according to your very good self, do interact with other particles...BUT WAIT, you then you go on to say TODAY that ( Even if it happened, that interaction would NOT be detectable, because of the difference in masses), and then you conclude by saying, (So essentially no. Neutrinos dont interact with anything. Any interactions are too rare for words like "interact") :LOL: You completely contradicted yourself Hartey!!! :eek::ROFLMAO:..

You appear to be in some form of crisis Hartey, after all you do hate to admit being being wrong...When Fermilab particle physicists, who are far more informed than you obviously are, tell me and anyone else who wishes to find out, that Neutrinos DO interact with other particles and therefore, if you still want to try and argue about it, take it up with them at Fermilab and all the resident Phd and Professors at that facility :D..

Proof of interactions between Neutrinos and Other Particles>>>>>It is the feeble interaction of Neutrinos with matter that makes them uniquely valuable as astronomical messengers...Unlike photons or charged particles, neutrinos can emerge from deep inside their sources and travel across the Universe without interference...They are not deflected by interstellar magnetic fields and are not absorbed by intervening matter...However, this same trait makes cosmic neutrinos extremely difficult to detect, immense instruments are required to find them in sufficient numbers to trace their origin..

Neutrinos can interact via the neutral current (involving the exchange of a Z bosun) or charged current (involving the exchange of a W bosun) weak interactions..

In a neutral current interaction, the neutrino leaves the detector after having transferred some of its energy and momentum to a target particle..All three neutrino flavors can participate regardless of the neutrino energy..However, no neutrino flavor information is left behind.

In a charged current interaction, the neutrino transforms into its partner lepton (electron muon or tau) However, if the Neutrino does not have sufficient energy to create its heavier partners mass, the charged current interaction is unavailable to it..Solar and reactor Neutrinos have enough energy to create electrons...Most accelerator-based neutrino beams can also create muons, and a few can create taus...A detector that distinguishes among these leptons can reveal the flavor of the incident Neutrino in a charged current interaction...Because the interaction involves the exchange of a charged boson, the target particle also changes character (eg Neutron to Proton)..

Below is a photo taken from NOVA, the Neutrino Detector at Fermilab, showing particles produced by a Neutrino Interaction..

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Kairos

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Patent a neutrino-based municipal broadband radio and associated modems, and you'd be rich.
 

TimeFlipper

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Patent a neutrino-based municipal broadband radio and associated modems, and you'd be rich.
I already tried that, but unfortunately i had problems detaining the neutrinos long enough in my home brew plasma-detector, and they kept interacting with matter particles, and producing electrons, that i have an abundance of :LOL:..
 
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