Media Why The Sun May Suddenly Destroy All of Our Electronics

scott93257

Junior Member
Messages
103
I take it you haven't heard of the Ocean, the one thing we know less than 10% about. MHM.
We actually know more about outer space than we know of the depths of our own oceans. Pretty amazing isn't it? Challenger deep is supposedly the deepest part of the ocean but I am willing to bet there are depths that far exceed that.
 

scott93257

Junior Member
Messages
103
I can't wait, that sounds like epic fun. Hopefully I adapt my car to run on human blood before this occurs though so I can obtain a steady supply of fuel.
An old diesel will actually run off used cooking oil too and as I stated, the old diesel engines with mechanical injectors do not require computers or spark to run. Well no diesel engine requires spark as their POI is dependent on heat and compression. Now the newer engines that are under computer management will have a tougher time, but the old ones? Not so much
 

scott93257

Junior Member
Messages
103
An old diesel will actually run off used cooking oil too and as I stated, the old diesel engines with mechanical injectors do not require computers or spark to run. Well no diesel engine requires spark as their POI is dependent on heat and compression. Now the newer engines that are under computer management will have a tougher time, but the old ones? Not so much
We've rebooted a few times already. One more time can't hurt us. We're hurting us.
Man is nature's BIGGEST enemy!
 

Element115

Junior Member
Messages
147
Sir, there is no need for this.... You're not my girlfriend I don't need you blowin up my notifications.
8933
 

HDRKID

Senior Member
Messages
2,456
Carrington Event | CME Research Institute

Time to be afraid - preparing for the next big solar storm: Kemp

TAKE FROM Time to be afraid - preparing for the next big solar storm: Kemp
The Carrington Event
On the morning of September 1, 1859, amateur astronomer Richard Carrington ascended into the private observatory attached to his country estate outside of London. After cranking open the dome’s shutter to reveal the clear blue sky, he pointed his brass telescope toward the sun and began to sketch a cluster of enormous dark spots that freckled its surface. Suddenly, Carrington spotted what he described as “two patches of intensely bright and white light” erupting from the sunspots. Five minutes later the fireballs vanished, but within hours their impact would be felt across the globe.

That night, telegraph communications around the world began to fail; there were reports of sparks showering from telegraph machines, shocking operators and setting papers ablaze. All over the planet, colorful auroras illuminated the nighttime skies, glowing so brightly that birds began to chirp and laborers started their daily chores, believing the sun had begun rising. Some thought the end of the world was at hand, but Carrington’s naked eyes had spotted the true cause for the bizarre happenings: a massive solar flare with the energy of 10 billion atomic bombs. The flare spewed electrified gas and subatomic particles toward Earth, and the resulting geomagnetic storm—dubbed the “Carrington Event”—was the largest on record to have struck the planet.
 


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